Bain’s Cape Mountain – 26 May 2014

Produced at: James Sedgewick Distillery is located in Wellington, South Africa.

Description: It was founded in 1886 on the Berg River after several years of importing and selling spirits. The distillery is owned by Distell. Bain’s Cape Mountain Whisky was first launched in 2009 and is named for Andrew Geddes Bain and the Bainskloof mountain pass that bears his name. The whisky is made from South African grain sandstone filtered water. The whisky is aged in “first fill bourbon” oak casks (meaning that the barrels have been used only one time for the making of bourbon before coming to South Africa–we take this to mean that the whisky will carry vanilla and caramel notes that charred bourbon barrels are known for) for 3 years and then selected and “re-vatted” (in Scotland, they would call it a “marriage”) for an additional 2 years of aging for a total of 5. The “single grain” referenced in all the marketing literature is South African maize, which North Americans would recognize as corn. This brings the whisky into a class of corn whisky made popular in North American and often used to smooth out blended scotch.

Type: Scotch Whisky
Expression: Single Grain Chill filtered
Age: 5 Yrs
ABV: 43%

Tasting Notes:

Colour: Deep golden amber (slightly burnished) with many thick and long legs.
Nose: Sweet, vanilla syrup and warm toffee pudding notes. Slight burnt caramel with a charming floralness to it, as well as hints of coconut and dried fruits.
Palate: Creamy texture (and taste, like the top part of rice pudding – butter and sugar) with woody undercurrents and a gorgeous warm spiciness to it that runs all over your tongue and mouth.
Finish: Remarkably smooth and warm with a velvety mouth feel that has a lengthy finish with a backbone of spiciness to the end.

Awards:

IWSC 2012 – Gold Medal – Whisk(e)y Worldwide
WWA 2013 – World’s Best Grain Whisky

Bottle #37

All  of our Expression members in attendance loved this Whisky!

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